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Population Genomics Reveal Recent Speciation and Rapid Evolutionary Adaptation in Polar Bears

Overview of attention for article published in Cell, May 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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265 Dimensions

Readers on

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806 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
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Title
Population Genomics Reveal Recent Speciation and Rapid Evolutionary Adaptation in Polar Bears
Published in
Cell, May 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2014.03.054
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shiping Liu, Eline D. Lorenzen, Matteo Fumagalli, Bo Li, Kelley Harris, Zijun Xiong, Long Zhou, Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen, Mehmet Somel, Courtney Babbitt, Greg Wray, Jianwen Li, Weiming He, Zhuo Wang, Wenjing Fu, Xueyan Xiang, Claire C. Morgan, Aoife Doherty, Mary J. O’Connell, James O. McInerney, Erik W. Born, Love Dalén, Rune Dietz, Ludovic Orlando, Christian Sonne, Guojie Zhang, Rasmus Nielsen, Eske Willerslev, Jun Wang

Abstract

Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyper-lipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479-343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardiovascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 151 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 806 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 2%
Germany 4 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Colombia 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
Other 14 2%
Unknown 760 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 204 25%
Researcher 140 17%
Student > Bachelor 99 12%
Student > Master 98 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 36 4%
Other 130 16%
Unknown 99 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 447 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 126 16%
Environmental Science 38 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 2%
Engineering 9 1%
Other 62 8%
Unknown 107 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 735. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2022.
All research outputs
#20,159
of 21,732,065 outputs
Outputs from Cell
#164
of 16,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115
of 204,941 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell
#1
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,732,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,375 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,941 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.