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Hippocampal Neurogenesis Regulates Forgetting During Adulthood and Infancy

Overview of attention for article published in Science, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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319 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
960 Mendeley
citeulike
8 CiteULike
Title
Hippocampal Neurogenesis Regulates Forgetting During Adulthood and Infancy
Published in
Science, May 2014
DOI 10.1126/science.1248903
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. G. Akers, A. Martinez-Canabal, L. Restivo, A. P. Yiu, A. De Cristofaro, H.-L. Hsiang, A. L. Wheeler, A. Guskjolen, Y. Niibori, H. Shoji, K. Ohira, B. A. Richards, T. Miyakawa, S. A. Josselyn, P. W. Frankland

Abstract

Throughout life, new neurons are continuously added to the dentate gyrus. As this continuous addition remodels hippocampal circuits, computational models predict that neurogenesis leads to degradation or forgetting of established memories. Consistent with this, increasing neurogenesis after the formation of a memory was sufficient to induce forgetting in adult mice. By contrast, during infancy, when hippocampal neurogenesis levels are high and freshly generated memories tend to be rapidly forgotten (infantile amnesia), decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation mitigated forgetting. In precocial species, including guinea pigs and degus, most granule cells are generated prenatally. Consistent with reduced levels of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis, infant guinea pigs and degus did not exhibit forgetting. However, increasing neurogenesis after memory formation induced infantile amnesia in these species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 205 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 960 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 30 3%
Japan 7 <1%
Canada 6 <1%
Germany 6 <1%
Spain 5 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
France 4 <1%
Sweden 3 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Other 19 2%
Unknown 873 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 277 29%
Researcher 177 18%
Student > Master 131 14%
Student > Bachelor 108 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 55 6%
Other 212 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 370 39%
Neuroscience 223 23%
Psychology 123 13%
Unspecified 83 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 69 7%
Other 92 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 588. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2019.
All research outputs
#12,140
of 13,644,855 outputs
Outputs from Science
#735
of 62,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127
of 188,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#12
of 874 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,855 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 62,801 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 874 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.