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Modeling Hawaiian Ecosystem Degradation due to Invasive Plants under Current and Future Climates

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Modeling Hawaiian Ecosystem Degradation due to Invasive Plants under Current and Future Climates
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0095427
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam E. Vorsino, Lucas B. Fortini, Fred A. Amidon, Stephen E. Miller, James D. Jacobi, Jonathan P. Price, Sam 'Ohukani'ohi'a Gon, Gregory A. Koob

Abstract

Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of these invasive plants and developed robust ensemble species distribution models to define their respective potential distributions. The combinations of all species models using both binary and continuous habitat suitability projections resulted in estimates of species richness and diversity that were subsequently used to define an invasibility metric. The invasibility metric was defined from species distribution models with <0.7 niche overlap (Warrens I) and relatively discriminative distributions (Area Under the Curve >0.8; True Skill Statistic >0.75) as evaluated per species. Invasibility was further projected onto a 2100 Hawaii regional climate change scenario to assess the change in potential habitat degradation. The distribution defined by the invasibility metric delineates areas of known and potential invasibility under current climate conditions and, when projected into the future, estimates potential reductions in native ecosystem extent due to climate-driven invasive incursion. We have provided the code used to develop these metrics to facilitate their wider use (Code S1). This work will help determine the vulnerability of native-dominated ecosystems to the combined threats of climate change and invasive species, and thus help prioritize ecosystem and species management actions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 38%
Researcher 14 25%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Librarian 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 41%
Environmental Science 15 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 5%
Computer Science 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2014.
All research outputs
#1,495,742
of 12,819,049 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#24,809
of 139,053 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,305
of 189,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#685
of 3,601 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,049 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 139,053 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,601 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.