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Oiling accelerates loss of salt marshes, southeastern Louisiana

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, August 2017
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Title
Oiling accelerates loss of salt marshes, southeastern Louisiana
Published in
PLoS ONE, August 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0181197
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Beland, Trent W. Biggs, Dar A. Roberts, Seth H. Peterson, Raymond F. Kokaly, Sarai Piazza

Abstract

The 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill damaged thousands of km2 of intertidal marsh along shorelines that had been experiencing elevated rates of erosion for decades. Yet, the contribution of marsh oiling to landscape-scale degradation and subsequent land loss has been difficult to quantify. Here, we applied advanced remote sensing techniques to map changes in marsh land cover and open water before and after oiling. We segmented the marsh shorelines into non-oiled and oiled reaches and calculated the land loss rates for each 10% increase in oil cover (e.g. 0% to >70%), to determine if land loss rates for each reach oiling category were significantly different before and after oiling. Finally, we calculated background land-loss rates to separate natural and oil-related erosion and land loss. Oiling caused significant increases in land losses, particularly along reaches of heavy oiling (>20% oil cover). For reaches with ≥20% oiling, land loss rates increased abruptly during the 2010-2013 period, and the loss rates during this period are significantly different from both the pre-oiling (p < 0.0001) and 2013-2016 post-oiling periods (p < 0.0001). The pre-oiling and 2013-2016 post-oiling periods exhibit no significant differences in land loss rates across oiled and non-oiled reaches (p = 0.557). We conclude that oiling increased land loss by more than 50%, but that land loss rates returned to background levels within 3-6 years after oiling, suggesting that oiling results in a large but temporary increase in land loss rates along the shoreline.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 67%
Researcher 2 67%
Student > Master 2 67%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 67%
Student > Postgraduate 1 33%
Other 2 67%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 133%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 67%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 67%
Environmental Science 1 33%
Social Sciences 1 33%
Other 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#9,252,246
of 11,563,317 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#95,560
of 128,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,621
of 265,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,356
of 3,188 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,563,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 128,167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,188 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.