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ATP8B1 is essential for maintaining normal hearing

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2009
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Title
ATP8B1 is essential for maintaining normal hearing
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2009
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0807919106
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. M. Stapelbroek, T. A. Peters, D. H. A. van Beurden, J. H. A. J. Curfs, A. Joosten, A. J. Beynon, B. M. van Leeuwen, L. M. van der Velden, L. Bull, R. P. Oude Elferink, B. A. van Zanten, L. W. J. Klomp, R. H. J. Houwen

Abstract

ATP8B1 deficiency is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP8B1, which encodes the putative phospatidylserine flippase ATP8B1 (formerly called FIC1). ATP8B1 deficiency is primarily characterized by cholestasis, but extrahepatic symptoms are also found. Because patients sometimes report reduced hearing capability, we investigated the role of ATP8B1 in auditory function. Here we show that ATP8B1/Atp8b1 deficiency, both in patients and in Atp8b1(G308V/G308V) mutant mice, causes hearing loss, associated with progressive degeneration of cochlear hair cells. Atp8b1 is specifically localized in the stereocilia of these hair cells. This indicates that the mechanosensory function and integrity of the cochlear hair cells is critically dependent on ATP8B1 activity, possibly through maintaining lipid asymmetry in the cellular membranes of stereocilia.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 11%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2009.
All research outputs
#7,726,490
of 12,364,927 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#68,351
of 77,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,361
of 72,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#635
of 859 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,927 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,321 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 72,793 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 859 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.