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Mutational Profile of Advanced Primary and Metastatic Radioactive Iodine-Refractory Thyroid Cancers Reveals Distinct Pathogenetic Roles for BRAF, PIK3CA, and AKT1

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, June 2009
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Citations

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Title
Mutational Profile of Advanced Primary and Metastatic Radioactive Iodine-Refractory Thyroid Cancers Reveals Distinct Pathogenetic Roles for BRAF, PIK3CA, and AKT1
Published in
Cancer Research, June 2009
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-09-0727
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julio C. Ricarte-Filho, Mabel Ryder, Dhananjay A. Chitale, Michael Rivera, Adriana Heguy, Marc Ladanyi, Manickam Janakiraman, David Solit, Jeffrey A. Knauf, R. Michael Tuttle, Ronald A. Ghossein, James A. Fagin

Abstract

Patients with poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTC), anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC), and radioactive iodine-refractory (RAIR) differentiated thyroid cancers have a high mortality, particularly if positive on [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET). To obtain comprehensive genetic information on advanced thyroid cancers, we designed an assay panel for mass spectrometry genotyping encompassing the most significant oncogenes in this disease: 111 mutations in RET, BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS, PIK3CA, AKT1, and other related genes were surveyed in 31 cell lines, 52 primary tumors (34 PDTC and 18 ATC), and 55 RAIR, FDG-PET-positive recurrences and metastases (nodal and distant) from 42 patients. RAS mutations were more prevalent than BRAF (44 versus 12%; P = 0.002) in primary PDTC, whereas BRAF was more common than RAS (39 versus 13%; P = 0.04) in PET-positive metastatic PDTC. BRAF mutations were highly prevalent in ATC (44%) and in metastatic tumors from RAIR PTC patients (95%). Among patients with multiple metastases, 9 of 10 showed between-sample concordance for BRAF or RAS mutations. By contrast, 5 of 6 patients were discordant for mutations of PIK3CA or AKT1. AKT1_G49A was found in 9 specimens, exclusively in metastases. This is the first documentation of AKT1 mutation in thyroid cancer. Thus, RAIR, FDG-PET-positive metastases are enriched for BRAF mutations. If BRAF is mutated in the primary, it is likely that the metastases will harbor the defect. By contrast, absence of PIK3CA/AKT1 mutations in one specimen may not reflect the status at other sites because these mutations arise during progression, an important consideration for therapies directed at phosphoinositide 3-kinase effectors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 153 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 150 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 16%
Student > Postgraduate 13 8%
Student > Master 12 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 37 24%
Unknown 25 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 33 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 1%
Other 6 4%
Unknown 26 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2022.
All research outputs
#2,077,117
of 22,298,121 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#1,563
of 17,706 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,632
of 84,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#6
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,298,121 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,706 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 84,766 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.