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Vaccines are not associated with autism: An evidence-based meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies

Overview of attention for article published in Vaccine, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 12,508)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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222 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
988 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Vaccines are not associated with autism: An evidence-based meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies
Published in
Vaccine, June 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.04.085
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luke E. Taylor, Amy L. Swerdfeger, Guy D. Eslick

Abstract

There has been enormous debate regarding the possibility of a link between childhood vaccinations and the subsequent development of autism. This has in recent times become a major public health issue with vaccine preventable diseases increasing in the community due to the fear of a 'link' between vaccinations and autism. We performed a meta-analysis to summarise available evidence from case-control and cohort studies on this topic (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar up to April, 2014). Eligible studies assessed the relationship between vaccine administration and the subsequent development of autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Two reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. Disagreement was resolved by consensus with another author. Five cohort studies involving 1,256,407 children, and five case-control studies involving 9,920 children were included in this analysis. The cohort data revealed no relationship between vaccination and autism (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.92 to 1.06) or ASD (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.20), nor was there a relationship between autism and MMR (OR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.01), or thimerosal (OR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.77 to 1.31), or mercury (Hg) (OR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.07). Similarly the case-control data found no evidence for increased risk of developing autism or ASD following MMR, Hg, or thimerosal exposure when grouped by condition (OR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.83 to 0.98; p=0.02) or grouped by exposure type (OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.76 to 0.95; p=0.01). Findings of this meta-analysis suggest that vaccinations are not associated with the development of autism or autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the components of the vaccines (thimerosal or mercury) or multiple vaccines (MMR) are not associated with the development of autism or autism spectrum disorder.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9,428 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 988 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 1%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
New Zealand 2 <1%
Other 9 <1%
Unknown 947 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 262 27%
Student > Master 172 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 107 11%
Researcher 103 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 63 6%
Other 163 16%
Unknown 118 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 229 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 114 12%
Psychology 90 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 77 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 75 8%
Other 248 25%
Unknown 155 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6908. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2020.
All research outputs
#103
of 15,139,386 outputs
Outputs from Vaccine
#2
of 12,508 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2
of 190,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vaccine
#1
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,139,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,508 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.