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The effectiveness of coral reefs for coastal hazard risk reduction and adaptation

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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316 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
893 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
The effectiveness of coral reefs for coastal hazard risk reduction and adaptation
Published in
Nature Communications, May 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4794
Pubmed ID
Authors

Filippo Ferrario, Michael W. Beck, Curt D. Storlazzi, Fiorenza Micheli, Christine C. Shepard, Laura Airoldi

Abstract

The world's coastal zones are experiencing rapid development and an increase in storms and flooding. These hazards put coastal communities at heightened risk, which may increase with habitat loss. Here we analyse globally the role and cost effectiveness of coral reefs in risk reduction. Meta-analyses reveal that coral reefs provide substantial protection against natural hazards by reducing wave energy by an average of 97%. Reef crests alone dissipate most of this energy (86%). There are 100 million or more people who may receive risk reduction benefits from reefs or bear hazard mitigation and adaptation costs if reefs are degraded. We show that coral reefs can provide comparable wave attenuation benefits to artificial defences such as breakwaters, and reef defences can be enhanced cost effectively. Reefs face growing threats yet there is opportunity to guide adaptation and hazard mitigation investments towards reef restoration to strengthen this first line of coastal defence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 93 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 893 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 10 1%
Unknown 856 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 185 21%
Researcher 165 18%
Student > Bachelor 150 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 141 16%
Other 51 6%
Other 100 11%
Unknown 101 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 289 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 214 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 93 10%
Engineering 75 8%
Social Sciences 25 3%
Other 64 7%
Unknown 133 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 486. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2020.
All research outputs
#25,292
of 16,110,264 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#374
of 31,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229
of 192,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#3
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,110,264 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 31,140 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 192,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.