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Impact of naturally spawning captive-bred Atlantic salmon on wild populations: depressed recruitment and increased risk of climate-mediated extinction

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2009
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Title
Impact of naturally spawning captive-bred Atlantic salmon on wild populations: depressed recruitment and increased risk of climate-mediated extinction
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2009
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2009.0799
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip McGinnity, Eleanor Jennings, Elvira deEyto, Norman Allott, Patrick Samuelsson, Gerard Rogan, Ken Whelan, Tom Cross

Abstract

The assessment report of the 4th International Panel on Climate Change confirms that global warming is strongly affecting biological systems and that 20-30% of species risk extinction from projected future increases in temperature. It is essential that any measures taken to conserve individual species and their constituent populations against climate-mediated declines are appropriate. The release of captive bred animals to augment wild populations is a widespread management strategy for many species but has proven controversial. Using a regression model based on a 37-year study of wild and sea ranched Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) spawning together in the wild, we show that the escape of captive bred animals into the wild can substantially depress recruitment and more specifically disrupt the capacity of natural populations to adapt to higher winter water temperatures associated with climate variability. We speculate the mechanisms underlying this seasonal response and suggest that an explanation based on bio-energetic processes with physiological responses synchronized by photoperiod is plausible. Furthermore, we predict, by running the model forward using projected future climate scenarios, that these cultured fish substantially increase the risk of extinction for the studied population within 20 generations. In contrast, we show that positive outcomes to climate change are possible if captive bred animals are prevented from breeding in the wild. Rather than imposing an additional genetic load on wild populations by releasing maladapted captive bred animals, we propose that conservation efforts should focus on optimizing conditions for adaptation to occur by reducing exploitation and protecting critical habitats. Our findings are likely to hold true for most poikilothermic species where captive breeding programmes are used in population management.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Iceland 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 165 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 48 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 20%
Student > Master 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 6%
Professor 10 6%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 25 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 99 56%
Environmental Science 30 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 1%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 29 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2016.
All research outputs
#17,584,261
of 19,838,842 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#9,052
of 9,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,265
of 201,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#163
of 168 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,838,842 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,225 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,943 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 168 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.