↓ Skip to main content

Asymmetric percolation drives a double transition in sexual contact networks

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
60 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Asymmetric percolation drives a double transition in sexual contact networks
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1703073114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antoine Allard, Benjamin M. Althouse, Samuel V. Scarpino, Laurent Hébert-Dufresne

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) exhibits unique transmission dynamics in that it is concurrently spread by a mosquito vector and through sexual contact. Due to the highly asymmetric durations of infectiousness between males and females-it is estimated that males are infectious for periods up to 10 times longer than females-we show that this sexual component of ZIKV transmission behaves akin to an asymmetric percolation process on the network of sexual contacts. We exactly solve the properties of this asymmetric percolation on random sexual contact networks and show that this process exhibits two epidemic transitions corresponding to a core-periphery structure. This structure is not present in the underlying contact networks, which are not distinguishable from random networks, and emerges because of the asymmetric percolation. We provide an exact analytical description of this double transition and discuss the implications of our results in the context of ZIKV epidemics. Most importantly, our study suggests a bias in our current ZIKV surveillance, because the community most at risk is also one of the least likely to get tested.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Unspecified 6 13%
Other 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 14 30%
Unspecified 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Mathematics 4 9%
Other 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2017.
All research outputs
#265,926
of 13,226,012 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5,966
of 79,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,581
of 266,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#237
of 912 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,226,012 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,715 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,479 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 912 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.