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Centennial-scale reductions in nitrogen availability in temperate forests of the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Centennial-scale reductions in nitrogen availability in temperate forests of the United States
Published in
Scientific Reports, August 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-08170-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. K. McLauchlan, L. M. Gerhart, J. J. Battles, J. M. Craine, A. J. Elmore, P. E. Higuera, M. C. Mack, B. E. McNeil, D. M. Nelson, N. Pederson, S. S. Perakis

Abstract

Forests cover 30% of the terrestrial Earth surface and are a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Humans have doubled the amount of global reactive nitrogen (N), increasing deposition of N onto forests worldwide. However, other global changes-especially climate change and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations-are increasing demand for N, the element limiting primary productivity in temperate forests, which could be reducing N availability. To determine the long-term, integrated effects of global changes on forest N cycling, we measured stable N isotopes in wood, a proxy for N supply relative to demand, on large spatial and temporal scales across the continental U.S.A. Here, we show that forest N availability has generally declined across much of the U.S. since at least 1850 C.E. with cool, wet forests demonstrating the greatest declines. Across sites, recent trajectories of N availability were independent of recent atmospheric N deposition rates, implying a minor role for modern N deposition on the trajectory of N status of North American forests. Our results demonstrate that current trends of global changes are likely to be consistent with forest oligotrophication into the foreseeable future, further constraining forest C fixation and potentially storage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 21%
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Master 10 13%
Professor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 20 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 16 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 12%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 18 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,987,999
of 13,728,145 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#24,531
of 68,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,404
of 267,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#80
of 259 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,728,145 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,220 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,242 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 259 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.