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Environmental aspects related to tuberculosis and intestinal parasites in a low-income community of the Brazilian Amazon

Overview of attention for article published in Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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97 Mendeley
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Title
Environmental aspects related to tuberculosis and intestinal parasites in a low-income community of the Brazilian Amazon
Published in
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, August 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1678-9946201759057
Pubmed ID
Authors

Biatriz Araújo Cardoso, Fabio de Oliveira Fonseca, Antonio Henrique Almeida de Moraes Neto, Ana Caroline Guedes Souza Martins, Nissa Vilhena da Silva Oliveira, Luana Nepomuceno Gondim Costa Lima, George Alberto da Silva Dias, Maria Helena Féres Saad

Abstract

We carried out a cross-sectional study from January to December 2015 on 1,425 inhabitants from a floating population in the Brazilian Amazon (Murinin district, Pará State) to describe the population-based prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) from 2011 to 2014, recent TB contacts (rCts) latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI) , the coverage of the local health network, socio-environmental factors, and frequency of intestinal parasitic infection (IPI). We found that the sanitary structure was inadequate, with latrines being shared with other rooms within the same accommodation; well water was the main source of water, and 48% of families had low incomes. The average rate of TB was 105/100, 000 inhabitants per year; one third of TB patients had been household contacts of infected individuals in the past, and 23% of rCts were LTBI. More than half (65%) of 44% of the stools examined (representing 76% of the housing) had IPIs; the highest prevalence was of fecal-oral transmitted protozoa (40%, Giardia intestinalis ), followed by soil-transmitted helminths (23%). TB transmission may be related to insufficient disease control of rCts, frequent relocation, and underreporting. Education, adopting hygienic habits, improving sanitation, provision of a treated water supply and efficient sewage system, further comprehensive epidemiological surveillance of those who enter and leave the community and resources for basic treatment of IPIs are crucial in combating the transmission of these neglected diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Researcher 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 29 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 35 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2021.
All research outputs
#11,067,045
of 19,508,584 outputs
Outputs from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#243
of 431 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,614
of 284,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,508,584 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 431 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,560 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.