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The use of surveillance and preventative measures for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections in surgical patients

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
10 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
The use of surveillance and preventative measures for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections in surgical patients
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, May 2014
DOI 10.1186/2047-2994-3-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin T Kavanagh, Lindsay E Calderon, Daniel M Saman, Said K Abusalem

Abstract

The Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ) found that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with up to 375,000 infections and 23,000 deaths in the United States. It is a major cause of surgical site infections, with a higher mortality and longer duration of care than Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. A multifactorial bundled approach is needed to control this epidemic, with single interventions unlikely to have a significant impact on attenuating MRSA infection rates. Active surveillance has been studied in a wide range of surgical patients, including surgical intensive care and non-intensive care units; cardiac, vascular, orthopedic, obstetric, head and neck cancer and gastrostomy patients. There is sufficient evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of surveillance and eradication prior to surgery to recommend its use on an expanded basis. Studies on MRSA surveillance in surgical patients that were published over the last 10 years were reviewed. In at least five of these studies, the MRSA colonization status of patients was reported to be a factor in preoperative antibiotic selection, with the modification of treatment regiments including the switching to vancomycin or teicoplanin in MRSA positive preoperative patients. Several authors also used decolonization protocols on all preoperative patients but used surveillance to determine the duration of the decolonization. Universal decolonization of all patients, regardless of MRSA status has been advocated as an alternative prevention protocol in which surveillance is not utilized. Concern exists regarding antimicrobial stewardship. The daily and universal use of intranasal antibiotics and/or antiseptic washes may encourage the promotion of bacterial resistance and provide a competitive advantage to other more lethal organisms. Decolonization protocols which indiscriminately neutralize all bacteria may not be the best approach. If a patient's microbiome is markedly challenged with antimicrobials, rebuilding it with replacement commensal bacteria may become a future therapy. Preoperative MRSA surveillance allows the selection of appropriate prophylactic antibiotics, the use of extended decolonization protocols in positive patients, and provides needed data for epidemiological studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Denmark 1 1%
India 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 64 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 21%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Unspecified 5 7%
Other 20 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 49%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 19%
Unspecified 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2017.
All research outputs
#709,362
of 12,819,958 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#92
of 605 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,810
of 188,763 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,958 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 605 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,763 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them