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Deep Immune Profiling of an Arginine-Enriched Nutritional Intervention in Patients Undergoing Surgery

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Immunology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Deep Immune Profiling of an Arginine-Enriched Nutritional Intervention in Patients Undergoing Surgery
Published in
The Journal of Immunology, August 2017
DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1700421
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aghaeepour, Nima, Kin, Cindy, Ganio, Edward A., Jensen, Kent P., Gaudilliere, Dyani K., Tingle, Martha, Tsai, Amy, Lancero, Hope L., Choisy, Benjamin, McNeil, Leslie S., Okada, Robin, Shelton, Andrew A., Nolan, Garry P., Angst, Martin S., Gaudilliere, Brice L., Nima Aghaeepour, Cindy Kin, Edward A. Ganio, Kent P. Jensen, Dyani K. Gaudilliere, Martha Tingle, Amy Tsai, Hope L. Lancero, Benjamin Choisy, Leslie S. McNeil, Robin Okada, Andrew A. Shelton, Garry P. Nolan, Martin S. Angst, Brice L. Gaudilliere

Abstract

Application of high-content immune profiling technologies has enormous potential to advance medicine. Whether these technologies reveal pertinent biology when implemented in interventional clinical trials is an important question. The beneficial effects of preoperative arginine-enriched dietary supplements (AES) are highly context specific, as they reduce infection rates in elective surgery, but possibly increase morbidity in critically ill patients. This study combined single-cell mass cytometry with the multiplex analysis of relevant plasma cytokines to comprehensively profile the immune-modifying effects of this much-debated intervention in patients undergoing surgery. An elastic net algorithm applied to the high-dimensional mass cytometry dataset identified a cross-validated model consisting of 20 interrelated immune features that separated patients assigned to AES from controls. The model revealed wide-ranging effects of AES on innate and adaptive immune compartments. Notably, AES increased STAT1 and STAT3 signaling responses in lymphoid cell subsets after surgery, consistent with enhanced adaptive mechanisms that may protect against postsurgical infection. Unexpectedly, AES also increased ERK and P38 MAPK signaling responses in monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which was paired with their pronounced expansion. These results provide novel mechanistic arguments as to why AES may exert context-specific beneficial or adverse effects in patients with critical illness. This study lays out an analytical framework to distill high-dimensional datasets gathered in an interventional clinical trial into a fairly simple model that converges with known biology and provides insight into novel and clinically relevant cellular mechanisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 33%
Other 3 25%
Librarian 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 3 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2017.
All research outputs
#4,292,598
of 9,782,970 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Immunology
#3,629
of 8,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,627
of 258,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Immunology
#75
of 193 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,782,970 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,834 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 193 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.