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Horizon scanning for invasive alien species with the potential to threaten biodiversity in Great Britain

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
5 policy sources
twitter
103 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
206 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
453 Mendeley
Title
Horizon scanning for invasive alien species with the potential to threaten biodiversity in Great Britain
Published in
Global Change Biology, May 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12603
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helen E Roy, Jodey Peyton, David C Aldridge, Tristan Bantock, Tim M Blackburn, Robert Britton, Paul Clark, Elizabeth Cook, Katharina Dehnen-Schmutz, Trevor Dines, Michael Dobson, François Edwards, Colin Harrower, Martin C Harvey, Dan Minchin, David G Noble, Dave Parrott, Michael J O Pocock, Chris D Preston, Sugoto Roy, Andrew Salisbury, Karsten Schönrogge, Jack Sewell, Richard H Shaw, Paul Stebbing, Alan J A Stewart, Kevin J Walker

Abstract

Invasive alien species (IAS) are considered one of the greatest threats to biodiversity, particularly through their interactions with other drivers of change. Horizon scanning, the systematic examination of future potential threats and opportunities, leading to prioritization of IAS threats is seen as an essential component of IAS management. Our aim was to consider IAS that were likely to impact on native biodiversity but were not yet established in the wild in Great Britain. To achieve this, we developed an approach which coupled consensus methods (which have previously been used for collaboratively identifying priorities in other contexts) with rapid risk assessment. The process involved two distinct phases: Preliminary consultation with experts within five groups (plants, terrestrial invertebrates, freshwater invertebrates, vertebrates and marine species) to derive ranked lists of potential IAS. Consensus-building across expert groups to compile and rank the entire list of potential IAS. Five hundred and ninety-one species not native to Great Britain were considered. Ninety-three of these species were agreed to constitute at least a medium risk (based on score and consensus) with respect to them arriving, establishing and posing a threat to native biodiversity. The quagga mussel, Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, received maximum scores for risk of arrival, establishment and impact; following discussions the unanimous consensus was to rank it in the top position. A further 29 species were considered to constitute a high risk and were grouped according to their ranked risk. The remaining 63 species were considered as medium risk, and included in an unranked long list. The information collated through this novel extension of the consensus method for horizon scanning provides evidence for underpinning and prioritizing management both for the species and, perhaps more importantly, their pathways of arrival. Although our study focused on Great Britain, we suggest that the methods adopted are applicable globally.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 103 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 453 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 7 2%
France 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Other 6 1%
Unknown 431 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 93 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 76 17%
Student > Master 50 11%
Student > Bachelor 46 10%
Other 33 7%
Other 52 11%
Unknown 103 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 175 39%
Environmental Science 102 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 2%
Social Sciences 7 2%
Other 27 6%
Unknown 119 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 142. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2023.
All research outputs
#297,092
of 25,746,891 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#296
of 6,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,370
of 241,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#4
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,746,891 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,769 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.