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Ketogenic diets in the treatment of epilepsy.

Overview of attention for article published in Current Pharmaceutical Design, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Ketogenic diets in the treatment of epilepsy.
Published in
Current Pharmaceutical Design, August 2017
DOI 10.2174/1381612823666170809101517
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elia, Maurizio, Klepper, Joerg, Leiendecker, Baerbel, Hartmann, Hans, Klepper, Joerg, Hartmann , Hans

Abstract

Although a larger number of antiepileptic drugs became available in the last decades, epilepsy remains drug-resistant in approximately a third of patients. Ketogenic diet (KD), first proposed at the beginning of the last century, is complex and has anticonvulsant effects, yet not completely understood. Over the last decades, different types of ketogenic diets (KDs) have been developed, namely classical KD and modified Atkins diet (MAD). They offer an effective alternative for children and adults with drug-resistant epilepsies. We review several papers on KDs as an adjunctive treatment of refractory epilepsy of children and adults, discussing its efficacy and adverse events. Because of the heterogenous, uncontrolled nature of the studies, we analyzed all studies individually, without a meta-analysis. KDs may be considered first choice treatment in some specific metabolic conditions, such as glucose-transporter type 1 and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiencies, and mitochondrial complex I defects. Preliminary findings indicate that KDs may be specifically effective in some epileptic syndromes, such as West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy, febrile infection related epileptic syndrome, and drug-resistant idiopathic generalized epilepsies or refractory status epilepticus. Short term adverse events are usually mild in both children and adults, including gastrointestinal symptoms, hyperlipidemia, and hypercalciuria; potential long term adverse effects include nephrolitiasis, decreased bone density, and liver steatosis. Possible atherosclerotic effects remain a concern. Patients on KDs should be carefully monitored in specialized centers during initiation, maintenance and withdrawal periods, in order to minimize such adverse events, and to improve compliance. Although the majority of KD trials on children and adults with drug-resistant epilepsies are open-label, uncontrolled studies based on small samples, an increasing number of randomized controlled trials have provided better quality evidence on its efficacy in recent years. There is a need for future randomized clinical trials aimed to confirm the efficacy of KDs in specific epileptic syndromes, and to provide further information about some practical unsolved problems, i.e. for how long KD treatment should be continued.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Lecturer 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Arts and Humanities 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,071,801
of 14,083,757 outputs
Outputs from Current Pharmaceutical Design
#1,541
of 2,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,583
of 268,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Pharmaceutical Design
#7
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,083,757 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,773 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,413 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.