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Antibiotic therapy versus no antibiotic therapy for children aged two to 59 months with WHO-defined non-severe pneumonia and wheeze

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
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Title
Antibiotic therapy versus no antibiotic therapy for children aged two to 59 months with WHO-defined non-severe pneumonia and wheeze
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2014
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd009576.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zohra S Lassi, Rohail Kumar, Jai K Das, Rehana A Salam, Zulfiqar A Bhutta

Abstract

Worldwide, pneumonia is the leading cause of death among children under five years of age and accounts for approximately two million deaths annually. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed case management guidelines based on simple clinical signs to help clinicians decide on the appropriate pneumonia treatment. Children and infants who exhibit fast breathing (50 breaths per minute or more in infants two months to 12 months of age and 40 or more in children 12 months to five years of age) and cough are presumed to have non-severe pneumonia and the WHO recommends antibiotics. Implementation of these guidelines to identify and manage pneumonia at the community level has been shown to reduce acute respiratory infection (ARI)-related mortality by 36%, although apprehension exists regarding these results due to the questionable quality of evidence. As WHO guidelines do not make a distinction between viral and bacterial pneumonia, these children continue to receive antibiotics because of the concern that it may not be safe to do otherwise. Therefore, it is essential to explore the role of antibiotics in children with WHO-defined non-severe pneumonia and wheeze and to develop effective guidelines for initial antibiotic treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 127 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 18%
Student > Master 22 17%
Student > Bachelor 18 14%
Other 14 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 9%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 58 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 9%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 29 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,305,952
of 15,393,728 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#3,534
of 11,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,326
of 190,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#68
of 205 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,393,728 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,176 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,940 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 205 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.