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A multimodal dataset for various forms of distracted driving

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Data, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 1,290)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
A multimodal dataset for various forms of distracted driving
Published in
Scientific Data, August 2017
DOI 10.1038/sdata.2017.110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Salah Taamneh, Panagiotis Tsiamyrtzis, Malcolm Dcosta, Pradeep Buddharaju, Ashik Khatri, Michael Manser, Thomas Ferris, Robert Wunderlich, Ioannis Pavlidis

Abstract

We describe a multimodal dataset acquired in a controlled experiment on a driving simulator. The set includes data for n=68 volunteers that drove the same highway under four different conditions: No distraction, cognitive distraction, emotional distraction, and sensorimotor distraction. The experiment closed with a special driving session, where all subjects experienced a startle stimulus in the form of unintended acceleration-half of them under a mixed distraction, and the other half in the absence of a distraction. During the experimental drives key response variables and several explanatory variables were continuously recorded. The response variables included speed, acceleration, brake force, steering, and lane position signals, while the explanatory variables included perinasal electrodermal activity (EDA), palm EDA, heart rate, breathing rate, and facial expression signals; biographical and psychometric covariates as well as eye tracking data were also obtained. This dataset enables research into driving behaviors under neatly abstracted distracting stressors, which account for many car crashes. The set can also be used in physiological channel benchmarking and multispectral face recognition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 27%
Student > Master 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 16 33%
Engineering 15 31%
Psychology 2 4%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 120. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2017.
All research outputs
#165,411
of 15,534,439 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Data
#45
of 1,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,152
of 271,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Data
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,534,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,290 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,598 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them