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The descriptive epidemiology of the diurnal profile of bouts and breaks in sedentary time in older English adults

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Epidemiology, August 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
The descriptive epidemiology of the diurnal profile of bouts and breaks in sedentary time in older English adults
Published in
International Journal of Epidemiology, August 2017
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyx123
Pubmed ID
Authors

D Yerrakalva, A J Cooper, K Westgate, K T Khaw, N J Wareham, S Brage, S J Griffin, K Wijndaele

Abstract

High sedentary time is associated with adverse metabolic health outcomes and mortality in older adults. It has been suggested that breaking up sedentary time may be beneficial for metabolic health; however, population prevalence data are lacking on the patterns of sedentary behaviour which would identify opportunities for intervention. We used data of adults aged ≥ 60 years ( n  = 3705) from the population-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort, to characterize the patterns of total sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time and sedentary bouts across the day and assess their associations with participant characteristics, using multi-level regression. Sedentary time was measured objectively by a hip-mounted accelerometer (Actigraph TM GT1M) worn for 7 days during waking time. More than 50% of every waking hour was spent sedentary, increasing to a peak of 83% in the evening. On average fewer breaks were accrued in the evenings compared with earlier in the day. Marginally more sedentary time was accrued on weekend days compared with weekdays (difference 7.4 min, 95% confidence interval 5.0-9.7). Large proportions of this sedentary time appear to be accrued in short bouts (bouts of < 10 min for 32% of the time). Older age, being male, being retired, not being in paid employment and having a higher body mass index were associated with greater sedentary time and fewer breaks. Sedentary time is common throughout the day but peaks in the evenings with fewer breaks and longer bouts. We identified a number of characteristics associated with sedentary time and additionally inversely associated with sedentary breaks, which should inform the development and targeting of strategies to reduce sedentary time among older adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 19%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Professor 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Sports and Recreations 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 14 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2020.
All research outputs
#4,591,221
of 15,943,540 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Epidemiology
#2,276
of 4,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,283
of 272,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Epidemiology
#19
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,943,540 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,934 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.