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Sociodemographic, lifestyle and behavioural factors associated with consumption of sweetened beverages among adults in Cambridgeshire, UK: the Fenland Study

Overview of attention for article published in Public Health Nutrition, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
Title
Sociodemographic, lifestyle and behavioural factors associated with consumption of sweetened beverages among adults in Cambridgeshire, UK: the Fenland Study
Published in
Public Health Nutrition, August 2017
DOI 10.1017/s136898001700177x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Barrett, Fumiaki Imamura, Søren Brage, Simon J Griffin, Nicholas J Wareham, Nita G Forouhi

Abstract

We aimed to identify sociodemographic, lifestyle and behavioural determinants of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) among adults in Cambridgeshire, UK. Cross-sectional data were obtained from a cohort of 9991 adults born between 1950 and 1975. An FFQ was used to assess consumption of beverages and other dietary factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine potential determinants of consuming SSB and ASB (≥1 serving/d). Recruitment from general practice surgeries to participate in the ongoing population-based Fenland Study. Adults (n 9991) aged 30-64 years from three areas of Cambridgeshire, UK. Prevalence estimates for daily SSB and ASB consumption were 20·4 % (n 2041) and 8·9 % (n 893), respectively. SSB consumption (OR; 95 % CI) was more common in men than women (1·33; CI 1·17, 1·50) and among those reporting lower income (£40 000/year; 1·31; 1·09, 1·58). In contrast, daily ASB consumption was more common among women than men (1·62; 1·34, 1·96), those on weight-loss diets than those who were not (2·58; 2·05, 3·24) and those reporting higher income than lower income (1·53; 1·16, 2·00). Factors associated with higher consumption of each of SSB and ASB included being a younger adult, being overweight/obese, having shorter education, eating meals or snack foods while watching television, and skipping breakfast (P<0·05 each). Frequent consumers of SSB and ASB differ by several sociodemographic characteristics. However, increased BMI, younger age and unhealthy eating behaviours are common to both groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Unspecified 8 19%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Unspecified 12 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2017.
All research outputs
#2,606,288
of 11,805,285 outputs
Outputs from Public Health Nutrition
#675
of 1,998 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,733
of 267,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Public Health Nutrition
#28
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,805,285 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,998 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.