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Assimilation of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers from Microplastics by the Marine Amphipod, Allorchestes Compressa

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
7 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
149 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
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Title
Assimilation of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers from Microplastics by the Marine Amphipod, Allorchestes Compressa
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, June 2014
DOI 10.1021/es405717z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evan M. Chua, Jeff Shimeta, Dayanthi Nugegoda, Paul D. Morrison, Bradley O. Clarke

Abstract

Microplastic particles (MPPs; <1 mm) are found in skin cleansing soaps and are released into the environment via the sewage system. MPPs in the environment can sorb persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that can potentially be assimilated by organisms mistaking MPPs for food. Amphipods (Allorchestes compressa) exposed to MPPs isolated from a commercial facial cleansing soap ingested ≤ 45 particles per animal and evacuated them within 36 h. Amphipods were exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners (BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154 and -183) in the presence or absence of MPPs. This study has demonstrated that PBDEs derived from MPPs can be assimilated into the tissue of a marine amphipod. MPPs reduced PBDE uptake compared to controls, but they caused greater proportional uptake of higher-brominated congeners such as BDE-154 and -153 compared to BDE-28 and -47. While MPPs in the environment may lower PBDE uptake compared to unabsorbed free chemicals, our study has demonstrated they can transfer PBDEs into a marine organism. Therefore, MPPs pose a risk of contaminating aquatic food chains with the potential for increasing public exposure through dietary sources. This study has demonstrated that MPPs can act as a vector for the assimilation of POPs into marine organisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 321 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 67 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 19%
Student > Bachelor 55 17%
Researcher 49 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 5%
Other 40 12%
Unknown 40 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 104 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 84 25%
Chemistry 24 7%
Engineering 12 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 2%
Other 30 9%
Unknown 69 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,648,490
of 13,500,498 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,197
of 13,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,759
of 188,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#55
of 222 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,500,498 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,744 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 222 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.