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Relationship between articular eminence inclination and alterations of the mandibular condyle: a CBCT study

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Oral Research, March 2017
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Title
Relationship between articular eminence inclination and alterations of the mandibular condyle: a CBCT study
Published in
Brazilian Oral Research, March 2017
DOI 10.1590/1807-3107bor-2017.vol31.0025
Pubmed ID
Authors

SA, Saione Cruz, MELO, Saulo Leonardo Sousa, MELO, Daniela Pita de, FREITAS, Deborah Queiroz, CAMPOS, Paulo Sérgio Flores, SA, Saione Cruz, MELO, Saulo Leonardo Sousa, MELO, Daniela Pita de, FREITAS, Deborah Queiroz, CAMPOS, Paulo Sérgio Flores

Abstract

This study aimed at verifying the correlation among angulation of the articular eminence (AE), shape of the condyle and its degenerative bone diseases (DBDs), according to age and sex, through Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Five hundred and twenty-eight temporomandibular joints (TMJ) were evaluated. The condyles were classified as: flat, convex, angled and rounded, and the AE angulation was measured. The DBDs evaluated were osteophytes, flattening, erosion, subcortical cysts and spinal sclerosis. There was no difference in the mean angulations in relation to age group (p>0.05). In age groups of 60-69 years (p=0.003) and 70 years or over (p=0.021), the angulation was higher in males. There was an association between DBD and sex (p=0.047), in that the prevalence was higher in females. Differences in AE angles were not observed in condyles with one or no DBDs (p>0.05). However, the presence of two or more DBDs led to a decrease in the angle (p<0.05). Angled condyles showed higher AE angulations than the flat and convex types (p<0.01). In conclusion, the AE inclination is influenced by DBD and condyle shape; an association of two or more bone diseases in the condyle, or its flat or convex anatomy, results in a decrease in the angulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Professor 2 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 20 48%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 40%
Unspecified 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 19 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,240,952
of 11,627,913 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Oral Research
#51
of 148 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,088
of 264,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Oral Research
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,627,913 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 148 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,128 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.