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Range position and climate sensitivity: The structure of among-population demographic responses to climatic variation

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
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Title
Range position and climate sensitivity: The structure of among-population demographic responses to climatic variation
Published in
Global Change Biology, August 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13817
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amburgey, Staci M., Miller, David A. W., Campbell Grant, Evan H., Rittenhouse, Tracy A. G., Benard, Michael F., Richardson, Jonathan L., Urban, Mark C., Hughson, Ward, Brand, Adrianne B., Davis, Christopher J., Hardin, Carmen R., Paton, Peter W. C., Raithel, Christopher J., Relyea, Rick A., Scott, A. Floyd, Skelly, David K., Skidds, Dennis E., Smith, Charles K., Werner, Earl E., Staci M. Amburgey, David A. W. Miller, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Michael F. Benard, Jonathan L. Richardson, Mark C. Urban, Ward Hughson, Adrianne B. Brand, Christopher J. Davis, Carmen R. Hardin, Peter W. C. Paton, Christopher J. Raithel, Rick A. Relyea, A. Floyd Scott, David K. Skelly, Dennis E. Skidds, Charles K. Smith, Earl E. Werner

Abstract

Species' distributions will respond to climate change based on the relationship between local demographic processes and climate and how this relationship varies based on range position. A rarely tested demographic prediction is that populations at the extremes of a species' climate envelope (e.g., populations in areas with the highest mean annual temperature) will be most sensitive to local shifts in climate (i.e., warming). We tested this prediction using a dynamic species distribution model linking demographic rates to variation in temperature and precipitation for wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in North America. Using long-term monitoring data from 746 populations in 27 study areas, we determined how climatic variation affected population growth rates and how these relationships varied with respect to long-term climate. Some models supported the predicted pattern, with negative effects of extreme summer temperatures in hotter areas and positive effects on recruitment for summer water availability in drier areas. We also found evidence of interacting temperature and precipitation influencing population size, such as extreme heat having less of a negative effect in wetter areas. Other results were contrary to predictions, such as positive effects of summer water availability in wetter parts of the range and positive responses to winter warming especially in milder areas. In general, we found wood frogs were more sensitive to changes in temperature or temperature interacting with precipitation than to changes in precipitation alone. Our results suggest that sensitivity to changes in climate cannot be predicted simply by knowing locations within the species' climate envelope. Many climate processes did not affect population growth rates in the predicted direction based on range position. Processes such as species-interactions, local adaptation, and interactions with the physical landscape likely affect the responses we observed. Our work highlights the need to measure demographic responses to changing climate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 30%
Student > Master 8 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 59%
Environmental Science 17 23%
Unspecified 7 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2018.
All research outputs
#188,304
of 11,874,340 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#172
of 3,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,940
of 266,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#9
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,874,340 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,213 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,433 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.