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Tropical forests and global atmospheric change: a synthesis

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
86 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
452 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Tropical forests and global atmospheric change: a synthesis
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2004
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2003.1449
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yadvinder Malhi, Oliver L. Phillips

Abstract

We present a personal perspective on the highlights of the Theme Issue 'Tropical forests and global atmospheric change'. We highlight the key findings on the contemporary rate of climatic change in the tropics, the evidence-gained from field studies-of large-scale and rapid change in the dynamics and biomass of old-growth forests, and evidence of how climate change and fragmentation can interact to increase the vulnerability of plants and animals to fires. A range of opinions exists concerning the possible cause of these observed changes, but examination of the spatial 'fingerprint' of observed change may help to identify the driving mechanism(s). Studies of changes in tropical forest regions since the last glacial maximum show the sensitivity of species composition and ecology to atmospheric changes. Model studies of change in forest vegetation highlight the potential importance of temperature or drought thresholds that could lead to substantial forest decline in the near future. During the coming century, the Earth's remaining tropical forests face the combined pressures of direct human impacts and a climatic and atmospheric situation not experienced for at least 20 million years. Understanding and monitoring of their response to this atmospheric change are essential if we are to maximize their conservation options.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 452 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 21 5%
United States 6 1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Other 11 2%
Unknown 401 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 118 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 17%
Student > Master 73 16%
Student > Bachelor 33 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 7%
Other 98 22%
Unknown 21 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 211 47%
Environmental Science 147 33%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 36 8%
Social Sciences 5 1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 <1%
Other 15 3%
Unknown 34 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2017.
All research outputs
#2,403,013
of 13,251,190 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,917
of 4,950 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,712
of 189,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#31
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,251,190 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,950 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.