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Tracing biogeochemical subsidies from glacier runoff into Alaska's coastal marine food webs

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
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Title
Tracing biogeochemical subsidies from glacier runoff into Alaska's coastal marine food webs
Published in
Global Change Biology, September 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13875
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mayumi L. Arimitsu, Keith A. Hobson, D'Arcy N. Webber, John F. Piatt, Eran W. Hood, Jason B. Fellman

Abstract

Nearly half of the freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska originates from landscapes draining glacier runoff, but the influence of the influx of riverine organic matter on the trophodynamics of coastal marine food webs is not well understood. We quantified the ecological impact of riverine organic matter subsidies to glacier-marine habitats by developing a multi-trophic level Bayesian three-isotope mixing model. We utilized large gradients in stable (δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(2) H) and radiogenic (Δ(14) C) isotopes that trace riverine and marine organic matter sources as they are passed from lower to higher trophic levels in glacial-marine habitats. We also compared isotope ratios between glacial-marine and more oceanic habitats. Based on isotopic measurements of potential baseline sources, ambient water and tissues of marine consumers, estimates of the riverine organic matter source contribution to upper trophic-level species including fish and seabirds ranged from 12-44%. Variability in resource use among similar taxa corresponded to variation in species distribution and life histories. For example, riverine organic matter assimilation by the glacier-nesting seabirds Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) was greater than that of the forest-nesting marbled murrelet (B. marmoratus). The particulate and dissolved organic carbon in glacial runoff and near surface coastal waters was aged (12100 to 1500 years BP (14) C-age) but dissolved inorganic carbon and biota in coastal waters were young (530 years BP (14) C-age to modern). Thus terrestrial-derived subsidies in marine food webs were primarily composed of young organic matter sources released from glacier ecosystems and their surrounding watersheds. Stable isotope compositions also revealed a divergence in food web structure between glacial-marine and oceanic sites. This work demonstrates linkages between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and facilitates a greater understanding of how climate-driven changes in freshwater runoff have the potential to alter food web dynamics within coastal marine ecosystems in Alaska. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Master 12 18%
Professor 5 7%
Librarian 2 3%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,100,925
of 16,519,195 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#1,406
of 4,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,464
of 275,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#43
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,519,195 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,514 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,517 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.