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The Dynamics of Democracy, Development and Cultural Values

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
The Dynamics of Democracy, Development and Cultural Values
Published in
PLOS ONE, June 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0097856
Pubmed ID
Authors

Viktoria Spaiser, Shyam Ranganathan, Richard P. Mann, David J. T. Sumpter

Abstract

Over the past decades many countries have experienced rapid changes in their economies, their democratic institutions and the values of their citizens. Comprehensive data measuring these changes across very different countries has recently become openly available. Between country similarities suggest common underlying dynamics in how countries develop in terms of economy, democracy and cultural values. We apply a novel Bayesian dynamical systems approach to identify the model which best captures the complex, mainly non-linear dynamics that underlie these changes. We show that the level of Human Development Index (HDI) in a country drives first democracy and then higher emancipation of citizens. This change occurs once the countries pass a certain threshold in HDI. The data also suggests that there is a limit to the growth of wealth, set by higher emancipation. Having reached a high level of democracy and emancipation, societies tend towards equilibrium that does not support further economic growth. Our findings give strong empirical evidence against a popular political science theory, known as the Human Development Sequence. Contrary to this theory, we find that implementation of human-rights and democratisation precede increases in emancipative values.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 59 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 21%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Lecturer 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 23 37%
Engineering 4 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 16 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2021.
All research outputs
#3,557,550
of 20,938,646 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#45,524
of 179,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,694
of 205,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#768
of 3,041 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,938,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 179,493 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,851 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,041 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.