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Evidence of natural Wolbachia infections in field populations of Anopheles gambiae

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
139 Mendeley
Title
Evidence of natural Wolbachia infections in field populations of Anopheles gambiae
Published in
Nature Communications, June 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4985
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Baldini, Nicola Segata, Julien Pompon, Perrine Marcenac, W. Robert Shaw, Roch K. Dabiré, Abdoulaye Diabaté, Elena A. Levashina, Flaminia Catteruccia, Baldini F, Segata N, Pompon J, Marcenac P, Robert Shaw W, Dabiré RK, Diabaté A, Levashina EA, Catteruccia F

Abstract

Wolbachia are maternally transmitted intracellular bacteria that invade insect populations by manipulating their reproduction and immunity and thus limiting the spread of numerous human pathogens. Experimental Wolbachia infections can reduce Plasmodium numbers in Anopheles mosquitoes in the laboratory, however, natural Wolbachia infections in field anophelines have never been reported. Here we show evidence of Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Wolbachia sequences in both female and male germlines across two seasons, and determined that these sequences are vertically transmitted from mother to offspring. Whole-genome sequencing of positive samples suggests that the genetic material identified in An. gambiae belongs to a novel Wolbachia strain, related to but distinct from strains infecting other arthropods. The evidence of Wolbachia infections in natural Anopheles populations promotes further investigations on the possible use of natural Wolbachia-Anopheles associations to limit malaria transmission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Brazil 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Madagascar 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Burkina Faso 1 <1%
Czech Republic 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 125 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 29%
Researcher 38 27%
Student > Master 30 22%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Professor 5 4%
Other 17 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 97 70%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 5%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 9 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 107. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2015.
All research outputs
#72,705
of 8,032,818 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#1,286
of 12,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,963
of 178,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#47
of 568 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,032,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,482 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 568 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.