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A reference genome for common bean and genome-wide analysis of dual domestications

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Genetics, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Citations

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440 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
584 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
Title
A reference genome for common bean and genome-wide analysis of dual domestications
Published in
Nature Genetics, June 2014
DOI 10.1038/ng.3008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeremy Schmutz, Phillip E McClean, Sujan Mamidi, G Albert Wu, Steven B Cannon, Jane Grimwood, Jerry Jenkins, Shengqiang Shu, Qijian Song, Carolina Chavarro, Mirayda Torres-Torres, Valerie Geffroy, Samira Mafi Moghaddam, Dongying Gao, Brian Abernathy, Kerrie Barry, Matthew Blair, Mark A Brick, Mansi Chovatia, Paul Gepts, David M Goodstein, Michael Gonzales, Uffe Hellsten, David L Hyten, Gaofeng Jia, James D Kelly, Dave Kudrna, Rian Lee, Manon M S Richard, Phillip N Miklas, Juan M Osorno, Josiane Rodrigues, Vincent Thareau, Carlos A Urrea, Mei Wang, Yeisoo Yu, Ming Zhang, Rod A Wing, Perry B Cregan, Daniel S Rokhsar, Scott A Jackson

Abstract

Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for human consumption and has a role in sustainable agriculture owing to its ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. We assembled 473 Mb of the 587-Mb genome and genetically anchored 98% of this sequence in 11 chromosome-scale pseudomolecules. We compared the genome for the common bean against the soybean genome to find changes in soybean resulting from polyploidy. Using resequencing of 60 wild individuals and 100 landraces from the genetically differentiated Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools, we confirmed 2 independent domestications from genetic pools that diverged before human colonization. Less than 10% of the 74 Mb of sequence putatively involved in domestication was shared by the two domestication events. We identified a set of genes linked with increased leaf and seed size and combined these results with quantitative trait locus data from Mesoamerican cultivars. Genes affected by domestication may be useful for genomics-enabled crop improvement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 584 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 2%
Brazil 10 2%
Spain 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Mexico 3 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Other 18 3%
Unknown 527 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 137 23%
Researcher 120 21%
Student > Master 104 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 56 10%
Student > Bachelor 43 7%
Other 124 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 430 74%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 75 13%
Unspecified 46 8%
Environmental Science 11 2%
Computer Science 6 1%
Other 16 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2019.
All research outputs
#175,241
of 13,288,667 outputs
Outputs from Nature Genetics
#543
of 6,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,817
of 190,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Genetics
#12
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,288,667 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,032 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.