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Epidemiology and impact of HIV coinfection with Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C viruses in Sub-Saharan Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Virology, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
111 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
196 Mendeley
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Title
Epidemiology and impact of HIV coinfection with Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C viruses in Sub-Saharan Africa
Published in
Journal of Clinical Virology, September 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.jcv.2014.05.018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippa C. Matthews, Anna Maria Geretti, Philip J.R. Goulder, Paul Klenerman

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HCV) are blood-borne viruses with potentially shared routes of transmission. In high-income settings, the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on survival has unmasked chronic liver disease from viral hepatitis B or hepatitis C as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals with HIV infection. It is now feared that progressive liver disease may threaten the success of ART programmes in developing countries, where HCV or HBV testing and monitoring are not yet systematic among HIV-infected patients and ART use is generally blind to these co-infections. We set out to review recent data from Sub-Saharan Africa, in order to build a detailed and up-to-date picture of the epidemiology and emerging impact of HBV and HCV coinfection in countries at the heart of the HIV pandemic. There is a preponderance of HIV/HBV coinfection compared to HIV/HCV in this region, and significant caveats exist regarding the accuracy of published HCV seroprevalence surveys. Morbidity and mortality of coinfection is significant, and may be further enhanced in African populations due to the influence of host, viral and environmental factors. Careful scrutiny of the coinfection problem is vital to inform an approach to directing resources, planning public health initiatives, providing clinical care, and guiding future research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 189 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 20%
Student > Bachelor 29 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 14%
Researcher 24 12%
Student > Postgraduate 18 9%
Other 32 16%
Unknown 26 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 69 35%
Immunology and Microbiology 21 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 5%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 35 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2017.
All research outputs
#2,637,672
of 14,561,317 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Virology
#180
of 1,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,924
of 188,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Virology
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,561,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,472 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,310 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.