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Estimating the variation in need for community-based social care by body mass index in England and associated cost: population-based cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
24 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Estimating the variation in need for community-based social care by body mass index in England and associated cost: population-based cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4665-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vicky R. Copley, Nick Cavill, Jane Wolstenholme, Richard Fordham, Harry Rutter

Abstract

Adult obesity is linked to a greater need for social care because of its association with the development of long term conditions and because obese adults can have physical and social difficulties which inhibit daily living. Obesity thus has considerable social care cost implications but the magnitude of these costs is currently unknown. This paper outlines an approach to estimating obesity-related social care costs in adults aged over 65 in England. We used univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to investigate the relation between the self-reported need for social care and potential determinants, including body mass index (BMI), using data from Health Survey for England. We combined these modelled estimates of need for social care with the mean hours of help received, conditional on receiving any help, to calculate the expected hours of social care received per adult by BMI. BMI is positively associated with self-reported need for social care. A one unit (ie 1 kg/m(2)) increase in BMI is on average associated with a 5% increase in the odds of need for help with social care (odds ratio 1.05, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.07) in an unadjusted model. Adjusting for long term illness and sociodemographic characteristics we estimate the annual cost of local authority funded care for those who receive it is £599 at a BMI of 23 but £1086 at a BMI of 40. BMI is positively associated with self-reported need for social care after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and limiting long term illness. The increase in need for care with BMI gives rise to additional costs in social care provision which should be borne in mind when calculating the cost-effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 31%
Student > Bachelor 6 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Librarian 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 12%
Sports and Recreations 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,384,389
of 15,922,017 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,588
of 10,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,663
of 274,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,017 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,944 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them