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A marriage of convenience; a simple food chain comprised ofLemna minor(L.) andGammarus pulex(L.) to study the dietary transfer of zinc

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Biology, April 2014
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Title
A marriage of convenience; a simple food chain comprised ofLemna minor(L.) andGammarus pulex(L.) to study the dietary transfer of zinc
Published in
Plant Biology, April 2014
DOI 10.1111/plb.12179
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. Lahive, J. O'Halloran, M. A. K. Jansen

Abstract

Macrophytes contribute significantly to the cycling of metals in aquatic systems, through accumulation during growth and release during herbivory or decomposition. Accumulation of high levels of metals has been extensively documented in Lemnaceae (duckweeds). However, the degree of trophic transfer of metals from Lemnaceae to secondary consumers remains poorly understood. This study demonstrates that zinc accumulated in Lemna minor is bioavailable to the herbivore consumer Gammarus pulex. Overall, the higher the zinc content of L. minor, the more zinc accumulated in G. pulex. Accumulation in G. pulex was such that mortality occurred when they were fed high zinc-containing L. minor. Yet, the percentage of consumed zinc retained by G. pulex actually decreased with higher zinc concentrations in L. minor. We hypothesise that this decrease reflects internal zinc metabolism, including a shift from soluble to covalently bound zinc in high zinc-containing L. minor. Consistently, relatively more zinc is lost through depuration when G. pulex is fed L. minor with high zinc content. The developed Lemna-Gammarus system is simple, easily manipulated, and sensitive enough for changes in plant zinc metabolism to be reflected in metal accumulation by the herbivore, and therefore suitable to study ecologically relevant metal cycling in aquatic ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 10 24%
Unknown 9 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 29%
Environmental Science 11 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Engineering 2 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2014.
All research outputs
#9,866,872
of 12,359,058 outputs
Outputs from Plant Biology
#394
of 659 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,145
of 197,617 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Biology
#14
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,359,058 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 659 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,617 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.