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Human and bovine viruses in the Milwaukee River watershed: Hydrologically relevant representation and relations with environmental variables

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, August 2014
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
Title
Human and bovine viruses in the Milwaukee River watershed: Hydrologically relevant representation and relations with environmental variables
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, August 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.05.072
Pubmed ID
Authors

S.R. Corsi, M.A. Borchardt, S.K. Spencer, P.E. Hughes, A.K. Baldwin

Abstract

To examine the occurrence, hydrologic variability, and seasonal variability of human and bovine viruses in surface water, three stream locations were monitored in the Milwaukee River watershed in Wisconsin, USA, from February 2007 through June 2008. Monitoring sites included an urban subwatershed, a rural subwatershed, and the Milwaukee River at the mouth. To collect samples that characterize variability throughout changing hydrologic periods, a process control system was developed for unattended, large-volume (56-2800L) filtration over extended durations. This system provided flow-weighted mean concentrations during runoff and extended (24-h) low-flow periods. Human viruses and bovine viruses were detected by real-time qPCR in 49% and 41% of samples (n=63), respectively. All human viruses analyzed were detected at least once including adenovirus (40% of samples), GI norovirus (10%), enterovirus (8%), rotavirus (6%), GII norovirus (1.6%) and hepatitis A virus (1.6%). Three of seven bovine viruses analyzed were detected including bovine polyomavirus (32%), bovine rotavirus (19%), and bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 (5%). Human viruses were present in 63% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt, and 20% of low-flow samples. Maximum human virus concentrations exceeded 300genomiccopies/L. Bovine viruses were present in 46% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt and 14% of low-flow samples. The maximum bovine virus concentration was 11genomiccopies/L. Statistical modeling indicated that stream flow, precipitation, and season explained the variability of human viruses in the watershed, and hydrologic condition (runoff event or low-flow) and season explained the variability of the sum of human and bovine viruses; however, no model was identified that could explain the variability of bovine viruses alone. Understanding the factors that affect virus fate and transport in rivers will aid watershed management for minimizing human exposure and disease transmission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 63 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 23%
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Master 9 14%
Unspecified 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 24%
Unspecified 14 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 15%
Engineering 7 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2014.
All research outputs
#7,519,108
of 12,029,028 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#5,157
of 8,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,364
of 193,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#51
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,029,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,055 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,161 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.