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Advocating for malaria elimination - learning from the successes of other infectious disease elimination programmes

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
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Title
Advocating for malaria elimination - learning from the successes of other infectious disease elimination programmes
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2014
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-13-221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maxine A Whittaker, Angela J Dean, Arna Chancellor

Abstract

Malaria elimination is back on the agenda, but it remains challenging for countries to make the transition from effective control to elimination. Many other infectious diseases have been targeted by globally-coordinated elimination advocacy campaigns, and advocacy has been considered an essential component of the success of other disease elimination programmes. What can the malaria community learn from these successes? A review of infectious disease elimination programmes to identify successful elements of advocacy for disease elimination was undertaken. Key elements are: (i) a global elimination plan, supported by international health bodies; (ii) thorough costings and tools to support the business case; (iii) an approach that is positioned within a development framework; (iv) core elimination advocacy messages; (v) provision of advocacy tools for partners (vi) extensive and effective community engagement; and (vii) strong partnerships. These features provide insights into 'what works' in global elimination advocacy. Advocacy is a powerful tool to support the long-term political and financial commitment necessary for malaria elimination. The global malaria community needs to work together, to ensure that the early steps towards the end goal of malaria elimination are taken.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Burkina Faso 1 2%
Unknown 55 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 29%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Unspecified 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 16%
Unspecified 9 16%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2017.
All research outputs
#724,582
of 13,350,747 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#138
of 3,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,428
of 191,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,350,747 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,897 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,323 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them