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Evidence for improved memory from 5 minutes of immediate, post-encoding exercise among women

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 156)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
52 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for improved memory from 5 minutes of immediate, post-encoding exercise among women
Published in
Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41235-017-0068-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven B. Most, Briana L. Kennedy, Edgar A. Petras

Abstract

Memories consolidate over time, with one consequence being that what we experience after learning can influence what we remember. In these experiments, women who engaged in 5 minutes of low-impact exercise immediately after learning showed better recall for paired associations than did women who engaged in a non-exercise control activity. In experiments 1 and 2, this benefit was apparent in a direct comparison between exercise and non-exercise groups. In experiment 3, it was reflected in a weak, positive correlation between memory performance and exercise-induced change in heart rate. In experiment 4, similar patterns emerged, although they fell short of statistical significance. Such memorial benefits did not emerge among male participants. In experiment 1, half the participants alternatively engaged in an equivalent period of exercise prior to learning, with no benefits for retention of the learned material, suggesting that the memorial benefits of exercise-induced arousal may reflect a specific impact on post-learning processes such as memory consolidation. A meta-analysis across the experiments revealed a reliable benefit of post-learning exercise among women. Variation in the strength of the effect between experiments is consistent with a literature suggesting small but reliable benefits of acute exercise on cognitive performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Researcher 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 31%
Social Sciences 4 15%
Sports and Recreations 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 183. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2020.
All research outputs
#96,214
of 15,374,675 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#9
of 156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,741
of 272,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,374,675 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them