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ACCOUNTING FOR RATE VARIATION AMONG LINEAGES IN COMPARATIVE DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSES

Overview of attention for article published in Evolution, July 2014
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3 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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47 Mendeley
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Title
ACCOUNTING FOR RATE VARIATION AMONG LINEAGES IN COMPARATIVE DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSES
Published in
Evolution, July 2014
DOI 10.1111/evo.12469
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew G. Hope, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jason L. Malaney, Joseph A. Cook, Sandra L. Talbot

Abstract

Genetic analyses of contemporary populations can be used to estimate the demographic histories of species within an ecological community. Comparison of these demographic histories can shed light on community responses to past climatic events. However, species experience different rates of molecular evolution, and this presents a major obstacle to comparative demographic analyses. We address this problem by using a Bayesian relaxed-clock method to estimate the relative evolutionary rates of 22 small mammal taxa distributed across northwestern North America. We found that estimates of the relative molecular substitution rate for each taxon were consistent across the range of sampling schemes that we compared. Using three different reference rates, we rescaled the relative rates so that they could be used to estimate absolute evolutionary timescales. Accounting for rate variation among taxa led to temporal shifts in our skyline-plot estimates of demographic history, highlighting both uniform and idiosyncratic evolutionary responses to directional climate trends for distinct ecological subsets of the small mammal community. Our approach can be used in evolutionary analyses of populations from multiple species, including comparative demographic studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 43 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Researcher 11 23%
Student > Master 6 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 17%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2014.
All research outputs
#8,809,079
of 15,015,674 outputs
Outputs from Evolution
#3,031
of 3,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,473
of 190,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Evolution
#53
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,015,674 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,970 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.