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Analyzing Variability and the Rate of Decline of Migratory Shorebirds in Moreton Bay, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Conservation Biology, April 2011
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Title
Analyzing Variability and the Rate of Decline of Migratory Shorebirds in Moreton Bay, Australia
Published in
Conservation Biology, April 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01670.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

HOWARD B. WILSON, BRUCE E. KENDALL, RICHARD A. FULLER, DAVID A. MILTON, HUGH P. POSSINGHAM

Abstract

Estimating the abundance of migratory species is difficult because sources of variability differ substantially among species and populations. Recently developed state-space models address this variability issue by directly modeling both environmental and measurement error, although their efficacy in detecting declines is relatively untested for empirical data. We applied state-space modeling, generalized least squares (with autoregression error structure), and standard linear regression to data on abundance of wetland birds (shorebirds and terns) at Moreton Bay in southeast Queensland, Australia. There are internationally significant numbers of 8 species of waterbirds in the bay, and it is a major terminus of the large East Asian-Australasian Flyway. In our analyses, we considered 22 migrant and 8 resident species. State-space models identified abundances of 7 species of migrants as significantly declining and abundance of one species as significantly increasing. Declines in migrant abundance over 15 years were 43-79%. Generalized least squares with an autoregressive error structure showed abundance changes in 11 species, and standard linear regression showed abundance changes in 15 species. The higher power of the regression models meant they detected more declines, but they also were associated with a higher rate of false detections. If the declines in Moreton Bay are consistent with trends from other sites across the flyway as a whole, then a large number of species are in significant decline.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Australia 2 2%
Canada 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Poland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Mozambique 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 91 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 20%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Unspecified 8 7%
Other 32 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 56%
Environmental Science 25 23%
Unspecified 13 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Mathematics 2 2%
Other 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2014.
All research outputs
#7,719,235
of 12,348,877 outputs
Outputs from Conservation Biology
#2,200
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,122
of 197,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conservation Biology
#41
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,877 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,304 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.