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Which patient-specific and surgical characteristics influence postoperative pain after THA in a fast-track setting?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, August 2017
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Title
Which patient-specific and surgical characteristics influence postoperative pain after THA in a fast-track setting?
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1725-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yvon M. den Hartog, Gerjon Hannink, Nick T. van Dasselaar, Nina M. Mathijssen, Stephan B. Vehmeijer

Abstract

In our hospital a fast-track setting including a multimodal pain protocol is used for total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this multimodal pain protocol there is still a large range in reported postoperative pain between patients, which hinders mobilization and rehabilitation postoperatively. The goal of this study was to identify which patient-specific and surgical characteristics influence postoperative pain after THA in a fast-track setting. All 74 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip who underwent primary THA procedure by anterior supine intermuscular approach between November 2012 and January 2014 were included in this prospective cohort study. The protocol for pain medication was standardized. Postoperative pain determined with the Numeric Rating Score was collected at 17 standardized moments. Linear mixed models were used to examine potential patient-specific and surgical factors associated with increased postoperative pain. Pain patterns differed substantially across individuals. Adjusted for other variables in the model, preoperative use of pain medication (regression coefficient 0.78 (95% CI 0.28-1.26); p = 0.005) and preoperative neuropathic pain scored by DN4 (regression coefficient 0.68 (95% CI 0.15-1.20); p = 0.02) were the only factors significantly associated with higher postoperative pain scores. The knowledge of which factors are associated with higher postoperative pain scores after THA in a fast-track setting may help optimizing perioperative postoperative pain management and preoperative education of these patients. The study was retrospectively registered in the ISRCTN registry under identifier ISRCTN15422220 (date of registration: July 25, 2017).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Other 3 14%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 50%
Unspecified 5 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Psychology 2 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2018.
All research outputs
#11,454,847
of 12,886,920 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#2,352
of 2,563 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,567
of 264,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
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