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Ecological Stoichiometry Meets Ecological Engineering: Using Polycultures to Enhance the Multifunctionality of Algal Biocrude Systems

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
Title
Ecological Stoichiometry Meets Ecological Engineering: Using Polycultures to Enhance the Multifunctionality of Algal Biocrude Systems
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2017
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.7b02137
Pubmed ID
Authors

Casey M. Godwin, David C. Hietala, Aubrey R. Lashaway, Anita Narwani, Phillip E. Savage, Bradley J. Cardinale

Abstract

For algal biofuels to be economically sustainable and avoid exacerbating nutrient pollution, algal cultivation and processing must maximize rates of biofuel production while simultaneously minimizing the consumption of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers. We experimentally tested whether algal polycultures could be engineered to improve N- and P- nutrient-use efficiency compared to monocultures by balancing trade-offs in nutrient-use efficiency and biocrude production. We analyzed the flows of N and P through the processes of cultivation, biocrude production through hydrothermal liquefaction, and nutrient recycling in a laboratory-scale system. None of the six species we examined exhibited high N-efficiency, P-efficiency and biocrude production simultaneously; each had poor performance in at least one function (i.e. < 25th percentile). Polycultures of 2 to 6 species did not outperform the best species in any single function, but some polycultures exhibited more balanced performance and maintained all three functions at higher levels simultaneously than any of the monocultures (i.e. > 67th percentile). Moreover, certain polycultures came closer to optimizing all three functions than any of the monocultures. By balancing trade-offs between N- and P-efficiency and biocrude production, polycultures could be used to simultaneously reduce the demand for both N and P fertilizers by up to 85%.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 32%
Student > Master 5 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 16%
Lecturer 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 8 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 21%
Unspecified 2 11%
Engineering 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,880,259
of 11,682,907 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,508
of 11,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,927
of 263,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#75
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,682,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,860 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,290 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.