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Efficient invasion by Toxoplasma depends on the subversion of host protein networks

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Microbiology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
55 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Efficient invasion by Toxoplasma depends on the subversion of host protein networks
Published in
Nature Microbiology, August 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41564-017-0018-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amandine Guérin, Rosa Milagros Corrales, Michele L. Parker, Mauld H. Lamarque, Damien Jacot, Hiba El Hajj, Dominique Soldati-Favre, Martin J. Boulanger, Maryse Lebrun

Abstract

Apicomplexan parasites are important pathogens of humans and domestic animals, including Plasmodium species (the agents of malaria) and Toxoplasma gondii, which is responsible for toxoplasmosis. They replicate within the cells of their animal hosts, to which they gain access using a unique parasite-driven invasion process. At the core of the invasion machine is a structure at the interface between the invading parasite and host cell called the moving junction (MJ) (1) . The MJ serves as both a molecular doorway to the host cell and an anchor point enabling the parasite to engage its motility machinery to drive the penetration of the host cell (2) , ultimately yielding a protective vacuole (3) . The MJ is established through self-assembly of parasite proteins at the parasite-host interface (4) . However, it is unknown whether host proteins are subverted for MJ formation. Here, we show that Toxoplasma parasite rhoptry neck proteins (RON2, RON4 and RON5) cooperate to actively recruit the host CIN85, CD2AP and the ESCRT-I components ALIX and TSG101 to the MJ during invasion. We map the interactions in detail and demonstrate that the parasite mimics and subverts conserved binding interfaces with remarkable specificity. Parasite mutants unable to recruit these host proteins show inefficient host cell invasion in culture and attenuated virulence in mice. This study reveals molecular mechanisms by which parasites subvert widely conserved host machinery to force highly efficient host cell access. Toxoplasma gondii uses its proteins RON2, RON4 and RON5 to recruit host proteins, including the ESCRT-I components ALIX and TSG101 to the moving junction, a multimolecular structure that enables invasion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 55 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 35%
Researcher 12 21%
Unspecified 6 11%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 28%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 12%
Unspecified 6 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Other 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2018.
All research outputs
#333,507
of 12,768,104 outputs
Outputs from Nature Microbiology
#344
of 847 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,393
of 264,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Microbiology
#32
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,768,104 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 847 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 70.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,673 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.