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Future Oceanic Warming and Acidification Alter Immune Response and Disease Status in a Commercial Shellfish Species, Mytilus edulis L.

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs

Citations

dimensions_citation
66 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
152 Mendeley
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Title
Future Oceanic Warming and Acidification Alter Immune Response and Disease Status in a Commercial Shellfish Species, Mytilus edulis L.
Published in
PLOS ONE, June 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0099712
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clara L. Mackenzie, Sharon A. Lynch, Sarah C. Culloty, Shelagh K. Malham

Abstract

Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide are leading to physical changes in marine environments including parallel decreases in ocean pH and increases in seawater temperature. This study examined the impacts of a six month exposure to combined decreased pH and increased temperature on the immune response and disease status in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. Results provide the first confirmation that exposure to future acidification and warming conditions via aquarium-based simulation may have parallel implications for bivalve health. Collectively, the data suggests that temperature more than pH may be the key driver affecting immune response in M. edulis. Data also suggests that both increases in temperature and/or lowered pH conditions may lead to changes in parasite abundance and diversity, pathological conditions, and bacterial incidence in M. edulis. These results have implications for future management of shellfish under a predicted climate change scenario and future sustainability of shellfisheries. Examination of the combined effects of two stressors over an extended exposure period provides key preliminary data and thus, this work represents a unique and vital contribution to current research efforts towards a collective understanding of expected near-future impacts of climate change on marine environments.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 146 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 20%
Researcher 30 20%
Student > Master 22 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 19 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 39%
Environmental Science 39 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 1%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 25 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2020.
All research outputs
#952,319
of 19,476,606 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#13,665
of 173,052 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,867
of 199,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#306
of 3,013 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,476,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 173,052 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,013 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.