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A pragmatic lifestyle modification programme reduces the incidence of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease and dysglycaemia in a young healthy urban South Asian population: a randomised controlled…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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126 Mendeley
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Title
A pragmatic lifestyle modification programme reduces the incidence of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease and dysglycaemia in a young healthy urban South Asian population: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Medicine, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0905-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mahen Wijesuriya, Nikolaos Fountoulakis, Nicola Guess, Sarath Banneheka, Laksha Vasantharajah, Martin Gulliford, Giancarlo Viberti, Luigi Gnudi, Janaka Karalliedde

Abstract

There is an increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in young urban South-Asians. We tested the effect of a pragmatic trimonthly lifestyle modification (LSM) programme (P-LSM) versus a less-intensive 12-monthly control LSM (C-LSM) intervention on a primary composite endpoint of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease (new onset T2DM, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) and markers of cardio-renal disease) in participants aged 5-40 years with risk factors for T2DM. This was a randomised controlled trial performed at the National Diabetes Centre, Sri-Lanka. We individually randomised 4672 participants at risk of T2DM, of whom 3539 (mean age 22.5 (range 6-40 years, 48% males) received either trimonthly (P-LSM n = 1726) or 12-monthly (C-LSM n = 1813) peer educator advice aimed at reducing weight, improving diet, reducing psychological stress and increasing physical activity. During a median follow-up of 3 years, the cumulative incidence of the primary endpoint was n = 479 in P-LSM (74 per 1000 person years) vs. 561 in C-LSM (96 per 1000 person years), with an incident rate ratio (IRR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.83-0.96, P = 0.02). In post hoc analyses, new onset dysglycaemia (T2DM, IFG and IGT), was the major contributor to the composite and was significantly reduced by P-LSM (IRR 0.9, 95% CI 0.83-0.97, P = 0.01). A significant impact of P-LSM on the incidence of the composite endpoint was noted in 1725 participants (P-LSM n = 850, C-LSM n = 875) aged below 18; P-LSM n = 140 (48 per 1000 person years) versus C-LSM n = 174 (55.4 per 1000 person years), with an IRR of 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.94, P = 0.004). In a young at-risk South-Asian population, a pragmatic LSM programme significantly reduces the incidence of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease. Our results highlight the importance of early intervention in young at-risk subjects. World Health Organization international clinical trial registry platform ( SLCTR/2008/003 ). Registration Date: March 28, 2008. Retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 126 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 18%
Student > Bachelor 20 16%
Researcher 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 7%
Other 24 19%
Unknown 31 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 13%
Psychology 8 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 39 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 97. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2018.
All research outputs
#216,120
of 15,681,050 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#193
of 2,443 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,665
of 272,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,681,050 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,443 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,366 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them