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Diagnosis and empirical treatment of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in adult neutropenic patients: guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and…

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Hematology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
136 Mendeley
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Title
Diagnosis and empirical treatment of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in adult neutropenic patients: guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO)
Published in
Annals of Hematology, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00277-017-3098-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. J. Heinz, D. Buchheidt, M. Christopeit, M. von Lilienfeld-Toal, O. A. Cornely, H. Einsele, M. Karthaus, H. Link, R. Mahlberg, S. Neumann, H. Ostermann, O. Penack, M. Ruhnke, M. Sandherr, X. Schiel, J. J. Vehreschild, F. Weissinger, G. Maschmeyer

Abstract

Fever may be the only clinical symptom at the onset of infection in neutropenic cancer patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy. A prompt and evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic approach is mandatory. A systematic search of current literature was conducted, including only full papers and excluding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Recommendations for diagnosis and therapy were developed by an expert panel and approved after plenary discussion by the AGIHO. Randomized clinical trials were mainly available for therapeutic decisions, and new diagnostic procedures have been introduced into clinical practice in the past decade. Stratification into a high-risk versus low-risk patient population is recommended. In high-risk patients, initial empirical antimicrobial therapy should be active against pathogens most commonly involved in microbiologically documented and most threatening infections, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but excluding coagulase-negative staphylococci. In patients whose expected duration of neutropenia is more than 7 days and who do not respond to first-line antibacterial treatment, specifically in the absence of mold-active antifungal prophylaxis, further therapy should be directed also against fungi, in particular Aspergillus species. With regard to antimicrobial stewardship, treatment duration after defervescence in persistently neutropenic patients must be critically reconsidered and the choice of anti-infective agents adjusted to local epidemiology. This guideline updates recommendations for diagnosis and empirical therapy of fever of unknown origin in adult neutropenic cancer patients in light of the challenges of antimicrobial stewardship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 136 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 23 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 13%
Student > Postgraduate 16 12%
Student > Master 14 10%
Researcher 13 10%
Other 35 26%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 91 67%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 1%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 25 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,079,844
of 14,565,263 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Hematology
#51
of 1,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,766
of 270,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Hematology
#3
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,565,263 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,319 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,031 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.