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Surgery in Shackles: What Are Surgeons' Obligations to Incarcerated Patients in the Operating Room?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2017
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18 tweeters
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Citations

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Title
Surgery in Shackles: What Are Surgeons' Obligations to Incarcerated Patients in the Operating Room?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.9.pfor1-1709
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Incarcerated patients frequently require surgery outside of the correctional setting, where they can be shackled to the operating table in the presence of armed corrections officers who observe them throughout the procedure. In this circumstance, privacy protection-central to the patient-physician relationship-and the need to control the incarcerated patient for the safety of health care workers, corrections officers, and society must be balanced. Surgeons recognize the heightened need for gaining a patient's trust within the context of an operation. For an anesthetized patient, undergoing an operation while shackled and observed by persons in positions of power is a violation of patient privacy that can lead to increased feelings of vulnerability, mistrust of health care professionals, and reduced therapeutic potential of a procedure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 22%
Psychology 1 11%
Unknown 3 33%