↓ Skip to main content

The role of FKBP5 genotype in moderating long-term effectiveness of exposure-based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Translational Psychiatry, June 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
136 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The role of FKBP5 genotype in moderating long-term effectiveness of exposure-based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder
Published in
Translational Psychiatry, June 2014
DOI 10.1038/tp.2014.49
Pubmed ID
Authors

S Wilker, A Pfeiffer, S Kolassa, T Elbert, B Lingenfelder, E Ovuga, A Papassotiropoulos, D de Quervain, I-T Kolassa

Abstract

Exposure-based therapies are considered the state-of-the-art treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Yet, a substantial number of PTSD patients do not recover after therapy. In the light of the well-known gene × environment interactions on the risk for PTSD, research on individual genetic factors that influence treatment success is warranted. The gene encoding FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5), a co-chaperone of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), has been associated with stress reactivity and PTSD risk. As FKBP5 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1360780 has a putative functional role in the regulation of FKBP5 expression and GR sensitivity, we hypothesized that this polymorphism influences PTSD treatment success. We investigated the effects of FKBP5 rs1360780 genotype on Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) outcome, an exposure-based short-term therapy, in a sample of 43 survivors of the rebel war in Northern Uganda. PTSD symptom severity was assessed before and 4 and 10 months after treatment completion. At the 4-month follow-up, there were no genotype-dependent differences in therapy outcome. However, the FKBP5 genotype significantly moderated the long-term effectiveness of exposure-based psychotherapy. At the 10-month follow-up, carriers of the rs1360780 risk (T) allele were at increased risk of symptom relapse, whereas non-carriers showed continuous symptom reduction. This effect was reflected in a weaker treatment effect size (Cohen's D=1.23) in risk allele carriers compared with non-carriers (Cohen's D=3.72). Genetic factors involved in stress response regulation seem to not only influence PTSD risk but also responsiveness to psychotherapy and could hence represent valuable targets for accompanying medication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 133 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 20%
Student > Master 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Researcher 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 26 19%
Unknown 26 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 49 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 15%
Neuroscience 16 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 32 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2015.
All research outputs
#7,417,234
of 12,860,909 outputs
Outputs from Translational Psychiatry
#1,073
of 1,562 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,716
of 188,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Translational Psychiatry
#18
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,860,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,562 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.