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Alcohol and depression: Evidence from the 2014 health survey for England

Overview of attention for article published in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Alcohol and depression: Evidence from the 2014 health survey for England
Published in
Drug & Alcohol Dependence, November 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.08.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Awaworyi Churchill, L. Farrell

Abstract

A relatively large body of literature examines the association between depression and alcohol consumption, with evidence suggesting a bidirectional causal relationship. However, the endogeneity arising from this reverse causation has not been addressed in the literature. Using data on 5828 respondents from the Health Survey for England (HSE), this study revisits the relationship between alcohol and depression and addresses the endogenous nature of this relationship. We use information on self-assessed depression, and control for endogeneity using the Lewbel two-staged least square (2SLS) estimation technique. We find that drinking alcohol promotes depression, and this is consistent across several measures of drinking behaviour including the amount of alcohol consumed, consumption intensity, alcohol dependence and risk of dependence. While drinking may be generally accepted and in the case of England, part of the culture, this has costs in terms of both physical and mental health that ought not to be ignored. While public policy has predominantly focused on the physical aspects of excessive alcohol consumption it is possible that these policies will also have a direct positive spillover in terms of the mental health costs, through the impact of lower alcohol consumption on quality of life and wellbeing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 36%
Unspecified 6 13%
Student > Master 6 13%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Other 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 30%
Unspecified 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Engineering 3 6%
Other 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2017.
All research outputs
#930,982
of 12,244,743 outputs
Outputs from Drug & Alcohol Dependence
#514
of 3,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,766
of 266,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug & Alcohol Dependence
#39
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,244,743 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,777 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,414 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.