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An immune clock of human pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in Science Immunology, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 337)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
30 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
252 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
255 Mendeley
Title
An immune clock of human pregnancy
Published in
Science Immunology, September 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciimmunol.aan2946
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nima Aghaeepour, Edward A. Ganio, David Mcilwain, Amy S. Tsai, Martha Tingle, Sofie Van Gassen, Dyani K. Gaudilliere, Quentin Baca, Leslie McNeil, Robin Okada, Mohammad S. Ghaemi, David Furman, Ronald J. Wong, Virginia D. Winn, Maurice L. Druzin, Yaser Y. El-Sayed, Cecele Quaintance, Ronald Gibbs, Gary L. Darmstadt, Gary M. Shaw, David K. Stevenson, Robert Tibshirani, Garry P. Nolan, David B. Lewis, Martin S. Angst, Brice Gaudilliere

Abstract

The maintenance of pregnancy relies on finely tuned immune adaptations. We demonstrate that these adaptations are precisely timed, reflecting an immune clock of pregnancy in women delivering at term. Using mass cytometry, the abundance and functional responses of all major immune cell subsets were quantified in serial blood samples collected throughout pregnancy. Cell signaling-based Elastic Net, a regularized regression method adapted from the elastic net algorithm, was developed to infer and prospectively validate a predictive model of interrelated immune events that accurately captures the chronology of pregnancy. Model components highlighted existing knowledge and revealed previously unreported biology, including a critical role for the interleukin-2-dependent STAT5ab signaling pathway in modulating T cell function during pregnancy. These findings unravel the precise timing of immunological events occurring during a term pregnancy and provide the analytical framework to identify immunological deviations implicated in pregnancy-related pathologies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 252 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 255 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 255 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 24%
Researcher 56 22%
Unspecified 37 15%
Student > Master 25 10%
Student > Bachelor 19 7%
Other 56 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 50 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 45 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 38 15%
Other 38 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 380. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2019.
All research outputs
#29,376
of 13,845,935 outputs
Outputs from Science Immunology
#4
of 337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,478
of 268,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Immunology
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,845,935 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 337 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 66.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.