↓ Skip to main content

Support during pregnancy for women at increased risk of low birthweight babies

Overview of attention for article published in this source, July 2003
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
3 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Support during pregnancy for women at increased risk of low birthweight babies
Published by
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, July 2003
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000198
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hodnett, Ellen D, Fredericks, Suzanne

Abstract

Studies consistently show a relationship between social disadvantage and low birthweight. Many countries have programs offering special assistance to women thought to be at risk for giving birth to a low birthweight infant. These programs may include advice and counselling (about nutrition, rest, stress management, alcohol and recreational drug use), tangible assistance (eg transportation to clinic appointments, help with household responsibilities), and emotional support. The programs may be delivered by multidisciplinary teams of health professionals, by specially trained lay workers, or by a combination of lay and professional workers. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of programs offering additional social support for pregnant women who are believed to be at risk for giving birth to preterm or low birthweight babies. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (30 January 2003). Randomized trials of additional support during at-risk pregnancy by either a professional (social worker, midwife, or nurse) or specially trained lay person, compared to routine care. Additional support was defined as some form of emotional support (eg counselling, reassurance, sympathetic listening) and information/advice, either in home visits or during clinic appointments, and could include tangible assistance (eg transportation to clinic appointments, assistance with the care of other children at home). Reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Double data entry was performed. Study authors were contacted to request additional information. Sixteen trials involving 13,651 women were included. The trials were generally of good to excellent quality, although 3 used an allocation method likely to introduce bias. Programs offering additional social support for at-risk pregnant women were not associated with improvements in any perinatal outcomes, but there was a reduction in the likelihood of caesarean birth and an increased likelihood of elective termination of pregnancy. Some improvements in immediate maternal psychosocial outcomes were found in individual trials. Pregnant women need the support of caring family members, friends, and health professionals. While programs which offer additional support during pregnancy are unlikely to prevent the pregnancy from resulting in a low birthweight or preterm baby, they may be helpful in reducing the likelihood of caesarean birth.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 33%
Unknown 2 67%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 200%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 67%
Student > Postgraduate 2 67%
Researcher 2 67%
Student > Master 1 33%
Other 3 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 267%
Psychology 3 100%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 67%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 33%
Social Sciences 1 33%
Other 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2009.
All research outputs
#3,332,735
of 11,787,411 outputs
Outputs from this source
#6,404
of 9,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,796
of 187,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age from this source
#156
of 214 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,787,411 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,203 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.5. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,325 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 214 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.