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Cognitive Dysfunctions in Intellectual Disabilities: The Contributions of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR Pathways

Overview of attention for article published in Annual Review of Genomics & Human Genetics, August 2017
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

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109 Mendeley
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Title
Cognitive Dysfunctions in Intellectual Disabilities: The Contributions of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR Pathways
Published in
Annual Review of Genomics & Human Genetics, August 2017
DOI 10.1146/annurev-genom-091416-035332
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah C. Borrie, Hilde Brems, Eric Legius, Claudia Bagni

Abstract

The Ras-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling cascades were originally identified as cancer regulatory pathways but have now been demonstrated to be critical for synaptic plasticity and behavior. Neurodevelopmental disorders arising from mutations in these pathways exhibit related neurological phenotypes, including cognitive dysfunction, autism, and intellectual disability. The downstream targets of these pathways include regulation of transcription and protein synthesis. Other disorders that affect protein translation include fragile X syndrome (an important cause of syndromal autism), and other translational regulators are now also linked to autism. Here, we review how mechanisms of synaptic plasticity have been revealed by studies of mouse models for Ras-MAPK, PI3K-AKT-mTOR, and translation regulatory pathway disorders. We discuss the face validity of these mouse models and review current progress in clinical trials directed at ameliorating cognitive and behavioral symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 24%
Student > Master 19 17%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 17 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 32 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 7%
Psychology 7 6%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,991,347
of 11,695,895 outputs
Outputs from Annual Review of Genomics & Human Genetics
#202
of 242 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,791
of 263,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annual Review of Genomics & Human Genetics
#15
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,695,895 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 242 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,717 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.