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Suppression of cortical seizures by optic stimulation of the reticular thalamus in PV-mhChR2-YFP BAC transgenic mice

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, September 2017
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Title
Suppression of cortical seizures by optic stimulation of the reticular thalamus in PV-mhChR2-YFP BAC transgenic mice
Published in
Molecular Brain, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13041-017-0320-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Jen Chang, Wei Pang Chang, Bai Chuang Shyu

Abstract

Deep brain stimulation in thalamic regions has been proposed as a treatment for epilepsy. The electrical current excites thalamocortical activity which is controlled by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (nRT). Previous studies showed that enhancing GABAergic inhibitory strength in the nRT reduces the duration and power of seizures, indicating that the thalamus plays an important role in modulating cortical seizures. The aim of the present study was to apply optogenetics to study the role of the nRT in modulating cortical seizures. We used PV-ChR2-EYFP transgenic mice from Jackson Laboratories, in which only Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is expressed in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Cortical seizure-like activity was induced by electrical stimulation of the corpus callosum after applying 4-aminopyridine. ChR2 expression was abundant in the nRT and cerebellum in PV-ChR2-EYFP transgenic mice. Light stimulation in the nRT caused burst firing in regions of the thalamus and nRT in vitro. Multi-unit activity increased during high-frequency (100 and 50 Hz) light stimulation in the S1 region and thalamus in vivo. Corpus callosum stimulation-induced seizure-like activity was effectively suppressed by high-frequency (100 Hz) and long-duration (10 s) light stimulation. The suppressive effects were reversed by applying a GABAB receptor antagonist but not a GABAA receptor antagonist in the cortex. The results indicated that light stimulation affected thalamocortical relay neurons by activating ChR2-expression neurons in the nRT. High-frequency and long-duration light stimulation was more effective in suppressing cortical seizure-like activity. GABAB receptors may participate in suppressing seizure-like activity.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 15 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2020.
All research outputs
#10,119,126
of 15,882,393 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#446
of 791 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,310
of 273,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,882,393 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 791 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,933 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them