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Plastic debris in the open ocean

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
93 news outlets
blogs
32 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
287 tweeters
facebook
25 Facebook pages
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
9 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
558 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1592 Mendeley
Title
Plastic debris in the open ocean
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1314705111
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Cozar, F. Echevarria, J. I. Gonzalez-Gordillo, X. Irigoien, B. Ubeda, S. Hernandez-Leon, A. T. Palma, S. Navarro, J. Garcia-de-Lomas, A. Ruiz, M. L. Fernandez-de-Puelles, C. M. Duarte

Abstract

There is a rising concern regarding the accumulation of floating plastic debris in the open ocean. However, the magnitude and the fate of this pollution are still open questions. Using data from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation, regional surveys, and previously published reports, we show a worldwide distribution of plastic on the surface of the open ocean, mostly accumulating in the convergence zones of each of the five subtropical gyres with comparable density. However, the global load of plastic on the open ocean surface was estimated to be on the order of tens of thousands of tons, far less than expected. Our observations of the size distribution of floating plastic debris point at important size-selective sinks removing millimeter-sized fragments of floating plastic on a large scale. This sink may involve a combination of fast nano-fragmentation of the microplastic into particles of microns or smaller, their transference to the ocean interior by food webs and ballasting processes, and processes yet to be discovered. Resolving the fate of the missing plastic debris is of fundamental importance to determine the nature and significance of the impacts of plastic pollution in the ocean.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 287 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,592 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 18 1%
Brazil 14 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Belgium 6 <1%
Spain 5 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
Netherlands 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Chile 3 <1%
Other 23 1%
Unknown 1507 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 398 25%
Student > Master 351 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 244 15%
Researcher 223 14%
Unspecified 170 11%
Other 300 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 476 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 458 29%
Unspecified 249 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 113 7%
Engineering 88 6%
Other 302 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1196. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2019.
All research outputs
#2,654
of 13,412,313 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#108
of 80,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31
of 186,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4
of 929 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,412,313 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80,122 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,140 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 929 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.